Short and Sweet Reviews // Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

“He was going to live forever, or die in the attempt.”

― Joseph Heller, Catch-22

Catch-22, first published in 1953, is a satirical novel set during World War II. In it, we meet Yossarian a U.S. Army bombardier desperately trying to finish his required number of missions so he can get back home. We see the war from his viewpoint, and the viewpoint of the other men in his squadron as they try to survive and makes sense of the war.

I’ll be honest; I had a hard time with this book.

Every character is insane. The timeline is nearly impossible to follow. I couldn’t keep the characters or rank straight. The dialog was often circular and frustrating. There was a ton of death and violence and more prostitutes than are ever necessary for any story. Through most of it, I couldn’t even figure out what the damn point was.

Then, somewhere in the middle, I realized that was the point!

After that I loved it. It was an awful story written in the most brilliant way.  It’s not just about how horrible war is. It is about the mental hoops we have to jump through to justify and survive a war. How we can keep waging it when we know the value of human life. It makes the connection between war and our collective insanity.

“There was only one catch and that was Catch-22, that specified that a concern for one’s own safety in the face of dangers that were real and immediate was the process of a rational mind. Orr was crazy and could be grounded. All he had to do was ask; and as soon as he did, he would no longer be crazy and would have to fly more missions. Orr would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn’t, but if he was sane, he had to fly them. Yossarian was moved very deeply by the absolute simplicity of the clause of Catch-22 and let out a respectful whistle.”

― Joseph Heller, Catch-22

Reading this book wasn’t easy, but sometimes when something isn’t easy, it makes it all the more satisfying when you do accomplish it. Catch-22 made me think about war in a different way. It made me think about the pressure we place on soldiers to deny their most basic instinct, self-preservation. Is it right to do that? Who has the right to do that? And for how long do we ask people to live in a state of fear and forced courage before it starts to be a cruelty?

I highly recommend everyone at least attempt to read it. Only, when you do, don’t read it the way you do other books. You may have to fight with this one but just take your time and don’t give up. Don’t let the book defeat you. This book has some very important things to say, but it is the way they are said that is what sets this one apart. I’m glad I read it.

I think this one may have changed me.

I want to add that I think all writers should read this book. In my mind storytelling is something that is done neatly. A story must unfold in a straightforward and clear manner to be good. Catch-22 taught me that there was a different way to write. A story can be told in a sort of twisty-turny, jumpy, loopy, way and still be good if you do it right.

And Catch-22 definitely gets it right.

“The enemy is anybody who’s going to get you killed, no matter which side he is on.”

― Joseph Heller, Catch-22

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Lisa

Hello! My name is Lisa. I find the human condition fascinating and I often write stuff about that. I blog at zenandpi.com but you can also find me on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram, and if you like what I do, consider signing up for my newsletter. Thanks :)

3 thoughts on “Short and Sweet Reviews // Catch-22 by Joseph Heller”

  1. During my Freshman year of high school I choose to do a book report on Catch-22. after two weeks I approach my teacher and tell her I had know idea what I just read. She suggested I try again my senior year.
    I did. It became and still is my favorite book. So confusing but extremely re-readable. Glad to see other people enjoy it!

    Like

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