Short and Sweet Reviews // East of Eden by John Steinbeck

“And Cain went out from the presence of the Lord, and dwelt in the Land of Nod, on the east of Eden”

— Genesis, Chapter 4, verse 16

I don’t believe in God, nor do I think that the Bible is an accurate account of history, but I have always found the myths and stories fascinating. They offer glimpses into the human condition, and I that is what has made them timeless and compelling.

Steinbeck taps into this timelessness with what he considered to be his magnum opus, East of Eden. In it, we follow the stories of two families who, with each generation, reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the deadly rivalry of Cain and Abel in the farmlands and small towns of California’s Salinas Valley in the early 1900s.

In reading Steinbeck’s take on humanity’s origin story and I took away a meaning I had never considered before, a lesson on love. Instead of getting hung up on why one brother is favored over the other—or why God rejected one offering over the other—Steinbeck focuses on what matters, the way it makes the brothers feel. The way it makes them feel is shitty, and the way it makes them act is crazy.

“..it’s awful not to be loved. It’s the worst thing in the world…It makes you mean, and violent, and cruel.”

— John Steinbeck, East of Eden

I did have some issues with the book. There were some ridiculous characters, if you read the book, you will know exactly who I am talking about, and there were parts that felt unnecessary and lectures that felt too long. The book was a long one, though, and most of it was well written and powerful.

Overall I enjoyed East of Eden, and I do recommend that everyone read it. It does have something interesting to say about how each of us is shaped by love and lack of love and how we can perpetuate a cruel cycle simply because we cannot believe there is another way to love than the way we have been taught.

I highly recommend the book to aspiring writers like myself for Steinbeck’s amazing ability to write descriptive text that is beautiful and efficient. Through his words, I could damn near feel that California heat and smell the rich California air. He wrote just enough about the period to transport me there without boring me. He puts you into the setting in a way that doesn’t give too much away but lets you know you are reading about a very real and very magical place.

If you’ve read East of Eden, please drop a note in the comments and let me—and the other readers—know what you thought.

“And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”

— John Steinbeck, East of Eden

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Featured image via Unsplash

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Lisa

Hello! My name is Lisa. I find the human condition fascinating and I often write stuff about that. I blog at zenandpi.com but you can also find me on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram, and if you like what I do, consider signing up for my newsletter. Thanks :)

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